Seal Bay Nature Park Signage

This public engagement has ended. Thank you to everyone who completed the survey. We received 214 responses. 

Many of your responses included suggested improvements which we are working to incorporate within the signage moving forward. Here are a few changes that will be coming:

  • Increased icon sizes
  • Increased arrow sizes
  • Running loop signage within future parks where appropriate
  • Adjusting design of the smaller feature signs

Thank you for continuing to enjoy our regional parks. If you have any further feedback please contact us communityservices@comoxvalleyrd.ca



Have you noticed the new signs at Seal Bay Nature Park? In June 2020, K’ómoks First Nation (KFN) and the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD) revealed a new design for park signage in Seal Bay Nature Park, Xwee Xwhya Luq (pronounced Zway Why Luck).

The goal of the new directional park signage is to increase trail safety within the park and incorporate the Ayajuthem language. Ayajuthem is a Coast Salish language shared between the peoples of K’ómoks, Tla'Amin, Homalco and Klahoose. The new sign names included a variety of natural park elements, animals and cultural references.

We’re Checking In!

The CVRD will be using the design of these signs as a template for flagship parks (e.g. Mount. Geoffrey Nature Park), so we want to get it right, and ensure that park users are able to interpret, read and understand the signs.

The CVRD is seeking feedback on the following elements of the design:

  • Size and legibility of the signs.
  • Size and clarity of icons.
  • Visibility and clarity of trails and trail use on maps.
  • Clarity of park rules.

We are not seeking feedback on:

  • The incorporation of the Ayajuthem language or cultural elements incorporated within the signage.

The survey is now closed. Thank you to everyone who took the time to participate. We are reviewing the results, comments and suggestions. We will provide a report and summary of the results during summer 2021. 



Background Information


FAQs 
Q: How long was the survey open?A: The survey was open for one month, from May 1st - May 31st, 2021.
Q: Who could take the survey?A: The survey was open to all residents of the K'omoks First Nation and the Comox Valley.
Q: Why is the CVRD conducting this engagement now?A: The CVRD is conducting this engagement and survey as part of a continuum of initial re-design of Seal Bay Nature Park signage, which was unveiled in June 2020. An adjustment period of time was allotted for park visitors to familiarize themselves with the new design of park signage. We are now seeking feedback on the new design, as it will be used as a template for all new CVRD park signs moving forward.
Q: Will you report back on what changes may be incorporated?A: If changes are required, a report back will be provided during Summer 2021. Follow this project to receive any updates!





Have you noticed the new signs at Seal Bay Nature Park? In June 2020, K’ómoks First Nation (KFN) and the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD) revealed a new design for park signage in Seal Bay Nature Park, Xwee Xwhya Luq (pronounced Zway Why Luck).

The goal of the new directional park signage is to increase trail safety within the park and incorporate the Ayajuthem language. Ayajuthem is a Coast Salish language shared between the peoples of K’ómoks, Tla'Amin, Homalco and Klahoose. The new sign names included a variety of natural park elements, animals and cultural references.

We’re Checking In!

The CVRD will be using the design of these signs as a template for flagship parks (e.g. Mount. Geoffrey Nature Park), so we want to get it right, and ensure that park users are able to interpret, read and understand the signs.

The CVRD is seeking feedback on the following elements of the design:

  • Size and legibility of the signs.
  • Size and clarity of icons.
  • Visibility and clarity of trails and trail use on maps.
  • Clarity of park rules.

We are not seeking feedback on:

  • The incorporation of the Ayajuthem language or cultural elements incorporated within the signage.

The survey is now closed. Thank you to everyone who took the time to participate. We are reviewing the results, comments and suggestions. We will provide a report and summary of the results during summer 2021. 



Background Information


FAQs 
Q: How long was the survey open?A: The survey was open for one month, from May 1st - May 31st, 2021.
Q: Who could take the survey?A: The survey was open to all residents of the K'omoks First Nation and the Comox Valley.
Q: Why is the CVRD conducting this engagement now?A: The CVRD is conducting this engagement and survey as part of a continuum of initial re-design of Seal Bay Nature Park signage, which was unveiled in June 2020. An adjustment period of time was allotted for park visitors to familiarize themselves with the new design of park signage. We are now seeking feedback on the new design, as it will be used as a template for all new CVRD park signs moving forward.
Q: Will you report back on what changes may be incorporated?A: If changes are required, a report back will be provided during Summer 2021. Follow this project to receive any updates!



CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • What are the results of the sign survey that was conducted in May of this year? Thank you

    algibson asked 17 days ago

    Hi. 

    We received 214 responses to the survey which was open May 1-31, 2021. Much of the feedback provided suggested improvements to the signs. Here are some of the changes which resulted in our analysis of the results you can expect to see coming:

    • Increased icon sizes
    • Increased arrow sizes
    • Running loop signage within future parks where appropriate
    • Adjusting design of the smaller feature signs


    We thank you for your support and hope your continue to enjoy our regional parks!

    -CVRD Communication Team

  • I'm curious as to why so much gravel was put on the bike route and why some of the trails were shut down? It's taken a lot of fun out of the park for those that like the mountain bike features without it being overly complicated. The gravel also makes it difficult to ride through and it's challenging to get good flow while riding everytime you hit a patch. Rocks and roots are good for riding and unfortunately a lot of this has been taken out of the 10km route.

    MarieK asked 7 months ago

    Hello

    We added gravel to the Forest Loop Trail in locations that were very wet and muddy. Some trail users don’t mind the mud, roots or rocks while most walkers or runners try to keep their feet dry. In an effort to avoid the mud, people go around the edges of the trail gradually making the trail path wider and often trampling vegetation at the sides of the trail. Filling these wet spots with gravel helps keep people on the trails. We believe you will find that the gravel will pack down over time and become less noticeable in a few months.

    We covered some of  rocks and roots for a few different reasons. One is to smooth out some of the bumps. Others are to reduce damage to tree roots, reduce tripping hazards, and to provide a more horse friendly surface that in turns helps keep the horses on the trails. There are still lots of roots and rocks to challenge runners and cyclists in Seal Bay. You may wish explore other parks such as Nymph Falls and Wildwood Forest for a new challenge as there are plenty of rocky and rooty trails available.

    The trail closures at Seal Bay include a trail that connected the horse bike trail to the Loxley entrance, a portion of the Mitchell Grade, the southerly section of Twinflower and the far westerly section of the 10km loop. The connector to Loxley had drainage issues that were going to be costly to mitigate. We opted instead to make Maple Trail the connector. While park visitors have reopened this closed section it will be fenced off later this year. The Mitchell Grad and Twinflower closures were done to create a larger conservation area in the centre of the park to set aside where there would be less human disturbance to nature. The 10km loop was rerouted away from the fenceline south of Fitzell Road for the benefit of the residents with homes backing onto the trail as well as at the request of horse riders. The riders  had told us the fences at the edge of the trail posed a danger as a horse hoof could easily get entangled in fencing when the trail and fencing are that close. 

    Thanks for the questions and sharing your views.

    CVRD Parks Team

  • What is the policy on motorized vehicles in Seal Bay Park now? There used to be signs that said no motorized vehicles, but those have been removed. Although I am concerned that the motocross riders will decide to start riding in the park again like they used to, I am also wondering if there is a policy for electric bikes? Some electric "bikes" are as fast as gas powered motocross bikes these days. I am seeing an increasing number of electric bikes in the park, which are fast and heavy. With the proliferation of e-bikes with varying speed capabilities, it would seem to me th easiest and safest policy would be to not allow any motorized vehicles in Seal Bay Park, including e-bikes of any sort.

    kcaldwel asked 7 months ago

    Hello

    There has not been any policy change that permits motorized vehicles on the Seal Bay trails. The new sign indicates what uses are permitted. To help keep these signs small and quick to read we did not include prohibited uses. We have not had any reports of motorized vehicle use in the park in quite some time. If you are seeing evidence of ATVs and dirt bikes on the trails please let us know by calling 250-334-6000.

    The Seal Bay Master Plan allows for ebike use on trails designated for cycling. We are certainly seeing lots of ebikes on the trails along with an increase in the number of bikes in all our parks. We have not had any complaints about ebikes in Seal Bay nor any other CVRD park. We have had complaints about bikes in general either being ridden on foot trails or of cyclists riding very close and to fast past hikers. To address these last two complaints we have started patrols in Seal Bay on weekends. From the three shifts worked this month we encountered bikes on foot trails only once and  have found all cyclists to be courteous and respectful. The patrols will continue into the summer with one bylaw officer dedicating most of their hours to patrolling trails. Again, if you are witnessing incidents in Seal Bay or other trails please let us know.

    CVRD Parks Team