Help shape the future of our Sewer Service

TIME TO ‘PLUNGE IN’ ON SEWER PLANNING

The Comox Valley Sewer Service treats wastewater, or raw sewage, from homes and businesses in Courtenay, Comox and K’ómoks First Nation. More than 14,000 cubic metres of raw sewage from these communities flows daily through a pipe located along the Willemar Bluffs. This is an exposed section of beach that is vulnerable to damage by waves, rocks and logs and poses an environmental risk to our local beaches and ocean. A long-term plan that will accommodate the community’s growth and enable this at-risk pipe to be relocated is required.

The CVRD has completed the community engagement process on a shortlist of options for upgrading the service’s conveyance system, including the pipes and pump stations that move wastewater to the sewage treatment plant.

Information about the options are still available on this page, along with the link to a webinar providing an overview of the options here.

Next Steps:

  • Results of the public consultation will be summarized and shared with the public and technical advisory committee and Sewage Commission, for consideration in next steps.
  • The preferred option will be shared with the community when selected.
  • An Alternative Approval Process (AAP) will likely be held in 2021 to approve borrowing so that work can begin as soon as possible on a new conveyance system. Construction is currently estimated to begin in 2022 and last two years.

Costs: Implementation of any of these options will be significant for Courtenay and Comox taxpayers - ranging from $160 to $240 per year, per household. All potential routes will pass along Comox (Dyke) Road and through downtown Comox and the Lazo Hill area, which means an added burden of construction impacts for those moving through and living in these areas. Cost estimates are at a class C level, which means the project is at a preliminary design phase. Cost estimates at this stage are based on current market conditions. When a preferred option is chosen, the project will enter the detailed design phase, at which point costs will be further refined.

Groundwater Assessment: Over the summer, the CVRD conducted geotechnical and hydrogeological assessments in the areas of Lazo Road and Comox Hill. The data gathered will determine if ground conditions can support the directional drilling that would be required for construction. This includes ensuring that groundwater levels and groundwater quality would not be negatively impacted. Once data from this work is analyzed, reports will be made available to the public. Looking for more information? Please read our information sheet on sewer planning and groundwater or view the video of our groundwater webinar responding to questions from Lazo Area residents.

TIME TO ‘PLUNGE IN’ ON SEWER PLANNING

The Comox Valley Sewer Service treats wastewater, or raw sewage, from homes and businesses in Courtenay, Comox and K’ómoks First Nation. More than 14,000 cubic metres of raw sewage from these communities flows daily through a pipe located along the Willemar Bluffs. This is an exposed section of beach that is vulnerable to damage by waves, rocks and logs and poses an environmental risk to our local beaches and ocean. A long-term plan that will accommodate the community’s growth and enable this at-risk pipe to be relocated is required.

The CVRD has completed the community engagement process on a shortlist of options for upgrading the service’s conveyance system, including the pipes and pump stations that move wastewater to the sewage treatment plant.

Information about the options are still available on this page, along with the link to a webinar providing an overview of the options here.

Next Steps:

  • Results of the public consultation will be summarized and shared with the public and technical advisory committee and Sewage Commission, for consideration in next steps.
  • The preferred option will be shared with the community when selected.
  • An Alternative Approval Process (AAP) will likely be held in 2021 to approve borrowing so that work can begin as soon as possible on a new conveyance system. Construction is currently estimated to begin in 2022 and last two years.

Costs: Implementation of any of these options will be significant for Courtenay and Comox taxpayers - ranging from $160 to $240 per year, per household. All potential routes will pass along Comox (Dyke) Road and through downtown Comox and the Lazo Hill area, which means an added burden of construction impacts for those moving through and living in these areas. Cost estimates are at a class C level, which means the project is at a preliminary design phase. Cost estimates at this stage are based on current market conditions. When a preferred option is chosen, the project will enter the detailed design phase, at which point costs will be further refined.

Groundwater Assessment: Over the summer, the CVRD conducted geotechnical and hydrogeological assessments in the areas of Lazo Road and Comox Hill. The data gathered will determine if ground conditions can support the directional drilling that would be required for construction. This includes ensuring that groundwater levels and groundwater quality would not be negatively impacted. Once data from this work is analyzed, reports will be made available to the public. Looking for more information? Please read our information sheet on sewer planning and groundwater or view the video of our groundwater webinar responding to questions from Lazo Area residents.

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