Your Interests

5 months ago
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Let us know what you're interested in discussing when it comes to sewer service in Courtenay and Comox. What's important to you? What do you want us to be considering?

  • greendog about 1 year ago
    How much infrastructure is the CVRD intending to place on the Brent Road property, according to present, firm plans as well as more speculative plans?
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 1 year ago
      The new equalization basin that will be constructed on site this summer (more info at www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/upgrades) is the only new infrastructure currently planned. To accommodate the projected future growth of our community there will eventually need to be an expansion to the current facility. These future requirements will be determined by the Liquid Waste Management Planning process currently underway.
  • greendog about 1 year ago
    For as long as Courtenay and Comox's sewage is being treated in Electoral Area B of the Regional District, Area B should have voting participation on the Sewage Committee.
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 1 year ago
      Thank you for your comment. This topic is being reviewed as part of a governance review and discussed at the sewage commission.
      Hide Replies (4)
      • greendog about 1 year ago
        When was this issue last discussed at a Sewage Commission meeting? I am not aware that there was been any action since prior to last year's municipal election.
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        • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 1 year ago
          Hello Greendog: This issue has been discussed recently at the sewage commission, stemming from presentations and staff reports related to the sewage treatment plant’s operations and upcoming upgrades. At the commission meeting on June 11, a motion to allow Area B representation at the table was not successful. The suggestion will continue to be assessed through the governance review which is currently underway.
          You can review the minutes/agenda for the sewage commission meeting here: https://www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/minutes-agendas
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          • greendog about 1 year ago
            I have gone to the section of the CVRD website to which you referred me. I do not see that the Utility Governance issue was on the agenda. The continuing request for Area B representation was addressed with a tied vote; however, it's doubtful that the Sewage Commission itself has the authority to increase its membership, in any event. I was asking about the Utility Governance Process. I apologize if that was not clear. I'm aware that the consultant reported to the Board in September 2018 and presented the Report to Comox and Courtenay Councils that month as well. I want to know what forward steps have been taken on that project since September 2018.
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            • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 1 year ago
              Our apologies for the misunderstanding. An update on the utilities governance review was provided at the May sewage commission meeting. Recommendations are planned to be brought forward to the commission at its November 2019 meeting. The latest staff report (from the May meeting) is available here: http://bit.ly/maygovernancestaffreport
  • waterwatcher about 2 years ago
    Waterfront homes with old septic tanks that may be leaching into our ocean should be the highest priority when you are considering adding sewer lines. There are numerous waterfront homes in South Courtenay, and probably Comox as well, that were unwilling amalgamated into the city limits with promises of a sewer system that would protect our foreshore and yet years have passed and there is still no plans for a sewer system.
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
      Thank you for your comments, they have been noted.
    • Sid Lodewyk over 1 year ago
      All septic systems would be of concern, as all of the water goes to the ocean eventually. In some areas the sewer bylaws require that homes connect if there is an available public sewer. The initial costs are often carried by the municipality, with the homeowner paying the cost over a long period (e.g. 25 years) through their taxes. Are there similar provisions in the local bylaws?
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      • Admin Commented CVRD Staff over 1 year ago
        Hello Sid - The Comox Valley Sewer Service provides for residents within Comox and Courtenay boundaries only. There are no on-site systems within those boundaries. For information about septic management in electoral areas (outside of the service area currently being reviewed) please visit www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/septic
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        • Sid Lodewyk over 1 year ago
          Are you sure that all legacy septic systems are gone? That would be surprising as people often resist the cost? How do you know they are all connected?
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          • Admin Commented CVRD Staff over 1 year ago
            We can confirm there are no operating septic systems within Courtenay or Comox boundaries (there are onsite systems used in electoral areas outside of those boundaries). The cores of those communities were built using the sewer service, and any areas that have been added into the municipal boundaries have been required to connect to the system, providing proof that connection has been made.
  • Sid Lodewyk over 1 year ago
    What is planned for long term growth of the sewage truck system from rural areas? Other places / cities have several locations for trucks to dump their waste. Are any planned here? Will the heavy truck traffic through Comox continue?
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff over 1 year ago
      Hello Sid - There are no plans to create an alternative site for septage disposal or change traffic pattern/routes at this time. Municipal engineers from both Comox and Courtenay are both represented on the technical committee for the sewer planning process in order to review operations and future plans with a lens of the impact on their communities.
  • Teresa over 1 year ago
    Is greywater recycling to garden allowed for individual homes?
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff over 1 year ago
      While the CVRD encourages water reuse and conservation using tools like rain barrels, building codes currently do not allow for secondary pipes to divert water used in the home away from the approved treatment system (whether it be the local government wastewater treatment plant or an onsite septic system).
  • Admin Commented CVRD Staff over 1 year ago
    Thank you for your posts - please feel free to share your interests here.
  • Edi Johnston about 2 years ago
    Baynes Sound is an embayed water and should not be considered as an outfallsite.
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
      Thanks Edi - this planning process is for the Comox/Courtenay service areas using the existing treatment plant and outfall (not in Baynes Sound).
  • fmayhood about 2 years ago
    Reliable sanitary waste collection and treatment is essential to the health and wellness of a human society. I am interested in the redundancy and contingency that is/should be designed into the system.
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
      Hello – making sure the system is protected against failure is key to design of modern, regulatory compliant wastewater systems. Under current regulation significant redundancy is required at the treatment plant, and our plans for plant expansion will have to comply with these regulations. Certain components in the system are much harder to build in redundancy, such as the forcemain that conveys wastewater to the plant. Where redundancy is not currently practical, we are able to mitigate risk of failure by developing a very robust design: i.e. pipe material selection, routing etc. that would make a failure highly unlikely. This kind of planning will continue moving forward.
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      • fmayhood about 2 years ago
        Do you have and maintain disaster plans? Are they exercised regularly?
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        • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
          The CVRD’s broad emergency response plans, in the case of a natural disaster, do include prioritizing and protecting infrastructure. Last year, a spill response plan was also created for raw (untreated) effluent to prepare our team for quick and effective response in the case of a break in at-risk forcemains. Regular review of these plans is part of our ongoing emergency preparation.
          Here's the link to the spill response plan: https://www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/sites/default/files/docs/Services/sewer/emergency_spill_response_plan.pdf
  • scareybc about 2 years ago
    Where can I learn more about the process used to treat our sewage, (activated sludge, BNR, microfiltration? secondary or tertiary treatment?) and the quality of the water going into the ocean? I've checked the web site and not much info is given.
    I'm pleased to see that you are working on odor control.
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
      We love detail questions! Our wastewater moves through four steps to achieve the water quality standards required to return water to the ocean: 1) Pre-treatment: screening grit and solids 2) Primary treatment: Waste is allowed to settle and ‘heavies’ and fats/oils/grease are removed 3) Secondary treatment: an activated sludge process is used in large aeration tanks (not tertiary-level treatment) 4) Secondary Clarifier: final step of separation in the cleaning process.
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      • scareybc about 2 years ago
        Thanks! It's good to know what process is used, so suggestions for upgrades have a starting point.
  • scareybc about 2 years ago
    Where does the sludge generated at the treatment plant go? Is it composted or incinerated, or?
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
      The solids from the wastewater treatment process is managed two ways: preliminary screening removes solids that are sent to the landfill, and then further waste removed in the process is composted with wood waste (at a facility also located at the landfill site – which is being expanded this year!) and sold as a soil amendment called SkyRocket.
  • asechris about 2 years ago
    Can you provide more details on the new Greenwood main that is being installed and explain the different types of connections that are used in our sewer system. (ie. force main VS gravity, etc...). Will there be additional tie-ins to the Greenwood main or is it just a straight shot to the base?
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    • Admin Commented CVRD Staff about 2 years ago
      Hi there – the Greenwood Trunk Sanitary Sewer will be a gravity fed regional sewer line that will connect east Courtenay (at Anderton Road) to a manhole on Military Row, and then onto the treatment plant on Brent Road. As this is a deep regional sewer line, no sewer connections from individual homes and businesses will be made to the line at this point in time. We have a dedicated webpage set up for this project: www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/greenwoodtrunk - you can find info about the route and updates about plans there.