Shaping the future of our Sewer Service

SEWER PLANNING FLOWS AHEAD

On February 23, 2021 the sewage commission approved a plan to upgrade the pipes and pump stations that move wastewater to the sewage treatment plant. The preferred option (previously Option 2) will be constructed and funded in one phase and involves a combination of cut and cover construction (trenching) and directional drilling (a type of tunneling) from the Courtenay Pump Station to the Treatment Plant located on Brent Road.

This decision was based on input from staff, technical experts, public and technical advisors. The commission also considered input gathered as part of the public consultation completed in fall 2020. A report summarizing that feedback is available here.

Next Steps:

  • In March, the commission will review funding strategies and make decisions about an Alternate Approval Process regarding the required borrowing. An AAP is a cost effective and responsible way to seek voter approval for a critical infrastructure project that has undergone a thorough public consultation process. More information about how to participate will be available soon.
  • The conveyance route will now move into detailed design, which will determine the specifics of route alignment. Some changes from the conceptual maps shared with the public could be identified to minimize impacts to residents, businesses, archaeological sites, costs and efficiencies. Discussions are underway with the Town of Comox regarding the final route, infrastructure replacement standards and community impacts.
  • The CVRD will continue dialogue with stakeholders and residents. In particular those with properties located in potential right-of-ways and homeowners with wells.

Costs:

The project is anticipated to cost $73 million with an estimated 80-year service life for the new pipe. The cost per household is estimated at $150/per year for 30 years. Funding will include approximately $21 million from reserves and $52 million in debt to ensure costs are spread out between current and future taxpayers over the 30-year term. Public approval for the borrowing will be sought through the CVRD’s annual Alternative Approval Process taking place in May and June 2021.

More information on how to participate in this process will be available soon.

Groundwater Assessment:

Assessment of groundwater continues to ensure that alignment and design of the sewer pipe properly protects that resource, particularly in relation to wells in the Lazo area. Residents in the immediate area have been invited to participate in a well monitoring program.

Attend a webinar
A webinar is being held for Area B residents to walk through the process for determining sewer pipe alignment and learn more about how the CVRD is working to ensure groundwater protection.
When: March 4 at 4:30 pm.
How: Click this link to register

SEWER PLANNING FLOWS AHEAD

On February 23, 2021 the sewage commission approved a plan to upgrade the pipes and pump stations that move wastewater to the sewage treatment plant. The preferred option (previously Option 2) will be constructed and funded in one phase and involves a combination of cut and cover construction (trenching) and directional drilling (a type of tunneling) from the Courtenay Pump Station to the Treatment Plant located on Brent Road.

This decision was based on input from staff, technical experts, public and technical advisors. The commission also considered input gathered as part of the public consultation completed in fall 2020. A report summarizing that feedback is available here.

Next Steps:

  • In March, the commission will review funding strategies and make decisions about an Alternate Approval Process regarding the required borrowing. An AAP is a cost effective and responsible way to seek voter approval for a critical infrastructure project that has undergone a thorough public consultation process. More information about how to participate will be available soon.
  • The conveyance route will now move into detailed design, which will determine the specifics of route alignment. Some changes from the conceptual maps shared with the public could be identified to minimize impacts to residents, businesses, archaeological sites, costs and efficiencies. Discussions are underway with the Town of Comox regarding the final route, infrastructure replacement standards and community impacts.
  • The CVRD will continue dialogue with stakeholders and residents. In particular those with properties located in potential right-of-ways and homeowners with wells.

Costs:

The project is anticipated to cost $73 million with an estimated 80-year service life for the new pipe. The cost per household is estimated at $150/per year for 30 years. Funding will include approximately $21 million from reserves and $52 million in debt to ensure costs are spread out between current and future taxpayers over the 30-year term. Public approval for the borrowing will be sought through the CVRD’s annual Alternative Approval Process taking place in May and June 2021.

More information on how to participate in this process will be available soon.

Groundwater Assessment:

Assessment of groundwater continues to ensure that alignment and design of the sewer pipe properly protects that resource, particularly in relation to wells in the Lazo area. Residents in the immediate area have been invited to participate in a well monitoring program.

Attend a webinar
A webinar is being held for Area B residents to walk through the process for determining sewer pipe alignment and learn more about how the CVRD is working to ensure groundwater protection.
When: March 4 at 4:30 pm.
How: Click this link to register

  • Preferred Conveyance Route Selected for Comox Valley Sewer Service

    24 Feb 2021
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    On February 23, 2021, the Comox Valley Sewage Commission approved a plan to upgrade the pipes and pump stations that move wastewater from Courtenay, Comox and the K’ómoks First Nation to the sewage treatment plant.

    Key features of the selected option are:

    • A mix of tunneled sections (under Comox Ave. and Lazo hills) with traditional ‘cut-and-cover’ trenched installation. The tunneling will reduce the construction impact and operational pressure on the system.
    • Work to be undertaken as one phase, rather than separated into two phases divided by up to 15-20 years, to reduce risk posed by the estuary’s foreshore forcemain.

    The option is anticipated to cost $73 million, paid for by $21 million in reserves, and $52 million in long-term borrowing. The cost per household is estimated at $150/per year for 30 years. Read the press release here.

  • Public Input Informs Preferred Route Selection

    24 Feb 2021
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    The Comox Valley Sewage Commission’s selection of a preferred conveyance route was based on input from staff, technical experts, public and technical advisors. The Commission also considered input gathered as part of the public consultation completed in fall 2020. A report summarizing that feedback is available now.

    Read Report Here.


  • Preferred options for treatment and resources recovery selected

    09 Dec 2020
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    The Sewage Commission has approved the preferred options for treatment and resource recovery for the Comox Valley Sewer Service’s Liquid Waste Management Plan. Directors have approved Option 2 for treatment, which would see the addition of Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection and secondary treatment for all flows. This was the recommended option by the PAC/TAC based on their technical review and consideration of public feedback. Click here to read the staff report. The sewage commission has also agreed that reclaimed water use should be considered as part of the master planning process for the sewage treatment plant.

    • The preferred option for conveyance (pipes and pump stations) will be selected in coming months.
    • The CVRD will report back to the public on the full suite of LWMP decisions once completed.
    • Visit www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/lwmp for more information
  • Consultation period complete for shortlisted options

    13 Oct 2020

    The public consultation period for the shortlist of conveyance options is now complete. Thank you to everyone who participated in the online survey and attended the open houses and webinar. The project team will relay the results of the consultation to the public and technical advisory committees and Sewage Commission, for their consideration as a preferred option is selected. Watch the ConnectCVRD page for more updates as we move forward.

  • Time to Pipe Up: CVRD relaunches consultation on sewer service planning

    The Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD) relaunches its public consultation today on the long-term plan for the Comox Valley Sewer Service, which moves and treats raw sewage (wastewater) from Comox, Courtenay and K’ómoks First Nation.

    This stage of the process is looking at conveyance options – the pipes and pump stations that collect and move wastewater to the treatment plant. This system currently includes a raw sewage (wastewater) pipe located along Balmoral Beach (Willemar Bluffs) that is vulnerable to damage by waves, rocks and logs – and poses an environmental risk beaches and waters throughout the Comox Estuary, Point Holmes and Goose Spit coastline, as well as Baynes Sound.

    Three possible routes are under consideration that will allow the decommissioning of the exposed sewer pipe. Costs for implementation of any of these options will be significant for Courtenay and Comox taxpayers - ranging from $160 to $210 per year, per household. All potential routes will pass along Comox (Dyke) Road and through downtown Comox and the Lazo Hill area, which means an added burden of construction impacts for those moving through and living in these areas. Construction is currently estimated to begin in 2022 and last two years.

    After a postponement in March due to COVID-19, the public can once again ‘Pipe Up’ and weigh in on the cost of the proposed upgrades, potential construction impacts and environmental protection considerations for each route option.

    “There is a lot on people’s minds right now, while it’s hard to add sewer to this list– we are at a critical stage to discuss how the options under consideration will impact residents,” said David Frisch, Chair of the Sewage Commission. “The risk at Willemar Bluffs only increases as time passes and we need to hear from the community so that we can move with the right solution.”

    For more information, please explore this page. The survey is now closed.


  • Sewer Service Planning: Public Consultation Postponed

    08 Apr 2020
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    The Comox Valley Sewage Commission has approved plans to reschedule public engagement on the future of the Comox Valley Sewer Service, as the community adjusts to a new normal amidst COVID-19 mitigation measures. Consultation will now take place in the fall, when it’s hoped the community can participate with more interest and capacity.

    The revised schedule will include online and open house consultation through the month of September, with the goal of staff providing a recommended option, based on the public and technical experts’ feedback, to the sewage commission in November 2020.

    Read the full Press Release here: Sewer Service Consultation Postponed.

  • Sewage Commission Moves Long List Forward

    13 Mar 2019

    At their March 12 meeting, the Comox Valley Sewage Commission adopted the long list of options for conveyance, treatment and resource recovery in the sewage planning process underway now. A staff report, which included recommendations based on feedback from the public and technical advisory committees, outlined the full list of options that will be considered.

    Information sheets on the long list options are available in the documents section of this page (in right-hand column of webpage).

    The long list will now go through a review process with technical consultants and public and technical advisory committees, who will consider the agreed-upon goals and objectives of the planning process to identify a short list. Stay tuned for more information about how you can be involved in reviewing the short list.

    For more information, read the staff report here.

  • Goals and Objectives Adopted by Sewage Commission

    28 Feb 2019

    The draft goals and objectives developed by the public and technical advisory committees with feedback from the public, were presented to and adopted by the Comox Valley Sewage Commission on Feb. 25. The approved goals establish the decision-making framework for the the long-term conveyance, treatment and resource recovery options being collected and reviewed now. Minutes from the meeting, including the staff report, can be found here.

    Results from the long-list review process will go before the Sewage Commission in March.

  • Advisory Committee members chosen to represent public during sewer planning process

    03 Oct 2018
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    Eight residents have been appointed to the Public Advisory Committee to represent their communities in the development of a Liquid Waste Management Plan. These representatives from Comox, Courtenay and Area B, play an essential role in considering community goals and public opinion/feedback throughout the planning process. View the list of members here.