Comox Valley Sewer Conveyance Project

The Comox Valley Sewer Conveyance Project is a $73 million multi-year construction project that will replace the pipes and upgrade the pump stations that move more than 14,000 cubic metres of raw sewage each day to the sewage treatment plant on Curtis Road.

This new system will route sewer pipes further inland where they will no longer be vulnerable to damage by waves, rocks and logs.

The project is the result of the extensive Comox Valley Sewer System Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP) which started in 2018, and was developed over three years with the input of a public and technical advisory committee. Construction of the new sewer line will start in Spring 2023.

Follow along here for project updates as we move forward this important project.


Coming up Next:

  • Summer/Fall 2021: Property owners in Lazo Area where right-of-ways are proposed for tunneled pipe will be contacted to negotiate agreements
  • Fall/Winter 2021: Final project scope will be confirmed by the sewage commission, allowing for the tenders to be developed and contracts awarded
  • Winter 2021/2022: Scope for Conveyance Project and wrap-up for LWMP process to be presented to the community via public events

The Comox Valley Sewer Conveyance Project is a $73 million multi-year construction project that will replace the pipes and upgrade the pump stations that move more than 14,000 cubic metres of raw sewage each day to the sewage treatment plant on Curtis Road.

This new system will route sewer pipes further inland where they will no longer be vulnerable to damage by waves, rocks and logs.

The project is the result of the extensive Comox Valley Sewer System Liquid Waste Management Plan (LWMP) which started in 2018, and was developed over three years with the input of a public and technical advisory committee. Construction of the new sewer line will start in Spring 2023.

Follow along here for project updates as we move forward this important project.


Coming up Next:

  • Summer/Fall 2021: Property owners in Lazo Area where right-of-ways are proposed for tunneled pipe will be contacted to negotiate agreements
  • Fall/Winter 2021: Final project scope will be confirmed by the sewage commission, allowing for the tenders to be developed and contracts awarded
  • Winter 2021/2022: Scope for Conveyance Project and wrap-up for LWMP process to be presented to the community via public events
  • Planning underway for Sewer Conveyance Project

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    With a conceptual pipe route approved by the Sewage Commission in February 2021 and borrowing approved in July – the project team is working now on the final route and project scope, to be ready this fall/winter.

    Read the press release about the successful Alternate Approval Process here.

    The CVRD remains focused on minimizing costs and impacts on residents and businesses and discussions are underway with the Town of Comox Discussions are underway with the Town of Comox regarding the final route through the Town and mitigating community impacts. The CVRD is also working with the K’ómoks First Nation to protect archaeologically sensitive areas during construction in an effort to preserve cultural heritage sites, ancestral burial places and artifacts.

    Watch this page for updates on time and details of our next public engagement events in fall/winter 2021-22.

  • Update on Sewer Conveyance Planning Shared with Lazo Residents

    Two online sessions were offered in May 2021, to inform local residents about ongoing sewer planning and to address questions about the tunneling feature of the selected pipe route. This update was the third in a series of sessions hosted specifically for Lazo Area residents and build on an 18-month Liquid Waste Management Plan process that included multiple stages of public engagement. This included Area B representation on a public advisory committee (PAC) which reviewed, discussed and provided recommendations at each stage of the planning process.

    Video of the session is posted at the ConnectCVRD LWMP page.

    Any further questions? Share them here in the Questions tab or contact us at communications@comoxvalleyrd.ca.

  • Tunneling and Groundwater Information Shared with Lazo Area Residents

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    On March 4, the CVRD hosted a webinar for residents within the proposed tunneling area in Area B (Lazo area). The online session provided additional information about the groundwater monitoring and assessment work that has been completed to date, and the further planning that will be done before construction starts on the new sewer conveyance route, selected by the Sewage Commission in February. The project team responded to a number of questions from residents about potential impacts to their property, protection measures that are being planned, and other planning details.

    The information is now posted for anyone who was unable to attend:

    • Video of the session is now posted the at ConnectCVRD LWMP Page - you can find it in the videos section in the righthand menu or by clicking here.
    • While many questions were addressed during the 1.5 hour session, there were a few that required follow up. Those questions, along with the responses, are now posted in the FAQ section of the LWMP Connect CVRD page –in the right-hand menu bar as well or click here.

    Any further questions? Share them here in the Questions tab.

  • Preferred Conveyance Route Selected for Comox Valley Sewer Service

    On February 23, 2021, the Comox Valley Sewage Commission approved a plan to upgrade the pipes and pump stations that move wastewater from Courtenay, Comox and the K’ómoks First Nation to the sewage treatment plant.

    Key features of the selected option are:

    • A mix of tunneled sections (under Comox Ave. and Lazo hills) with traditional ‘cut-and-cover’ trenched installation. The tunneling will reduce the construction impact and operational pressure on the system.
    • Work to be undertaken as one phase, rather than separated into two phases divided by up to 15-20 years, to reduce risk posed by the estuary’s foreshore forcemain.

    The option is anticipated to cost $73 million, paid for by $21 million in reserves, and $52 million in long-term borrowing. The cost per household is estimated at $150/per year for 30 years. Read the press release here.

Page last updated: 16 July 2021, 11:20