Connected by Water

Welcome to the Connected by Water project! Connected by Water is all about building community, capacity, and connection in support of watershed protection and water conservation in the Comox Valley. This work starts with a simple question: What is a watershed? Watersheds are areas of land where all water travels to the same place. For most of the Comox Valley’s drinking water, that destination is Comox Lake. Watersheds are sometimes also called catchment areas or drainage basins.

Water enters a watershed in the form of rain or snowfall. This water travels at varying rates throughout the watershed as surface runoff, subsurface flow, stream flow, and underground toward the same destination, Comox Lake.

A watershed is made up of an interconnected network of waterways. Since water can only flow downhill, the boundaries of a watershed are defined by the shape of the land, or topography. Watersheds often cross ownership and jurisdictional boundaries, which presents both challenges and opportunities for watershed management.

Lands adjacent to streams, creeks, lakes, and wetlands - where the vegetation and soils are strongly influenced by the presence of water - are called riparian areas. Riparian areas are among the most biologically productive and valuable of all landscape types. Healthy riparian areas protect our watershed by maintaining biodiversity, reducing flood damage, trapping sediment, and preventing erosion. They also reduce or remove suspended sediments, bacteria, viruses, parasites, and excess nutrients.

The ecological services provided by the forests and riparian areas in the Comox Lake Watershed include the creation of high quality water and habitat for plants, animals, and people in the Comox Valley. This is why protecting our watershed is so important.

Welcome to the Connected by Water project! Connected by Water is all about building community, capacity, and connection in support of watershed protection and water conservation in the Comox Valley. This work starts with a simple question: What is a watershed? Watersheds are areas of land where all water travels to the same place. For most of the Comox Valley’s drinking water, that destination is Comox Lake. Watersheds are sometimes also called catchment areas or drainage basins.

Water enters a watershed in the form of rain or snowfall. This water travels at varying rates throughout the watershed as surface runoff, subsurface flow, stream flow, and underground toward the same destination, Comox Lake.

A watershed is made up of an interconnected network of waterways. Since water can only flow downhill, the boundaries of a watershed are defined by the shape of the land, or topography. Watersheds often cross ownership and jurisdictional boundaries, which presents both challenges and opportunities for watershed management.

Lands adjacent to streams, creeks, lakes, and wetlands - where the vegetation and soils are strongly influenced by the presence of water - are called riparian areas. Riparian areas are among the most biologically productive and valuable of all landscape types. Healthy riparian areas protect our watershed by maintaining biodiversity, reducing flood damage, trapping sediment, and preventing erosion. They also reduce or remove suspended sediments, bacteria, viruses, parasites, and excess nutrients.

The ecological services provided by the forests and riparian areas in the Comox Lake Watershed include the creation of high quality water and habitat for plants, animals, and people in the Comox Valley. This is why protecting our watershed is so important.

  • Seeking Your Input: New Trail Head Facilities and Amenities

    21 days ago
    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
    Wtp sitemap final

    The land acquired for the CVRD's new Water Treatment Plant includes unofficial access to the Bevan and River Trails within the Puntledge Trail Network. We are considering installing a connecting trail and new facilities to make the area more accessible to the public and are asking residents to weigh in with their opinions about amenities and other considerations.

    Participate in our Survey


    The land acquired for the CVRD's new Water Treatment Plant includes unofficial access to the Bevan and River Trails within the Puntledge Trail Network. We are considering installing a connecting trail and new facilities to make the area more accessible to the public and are asking residents to weigh in with their opinions about amenities and other considerations.

    Participate in our Survey


  • New land acquisition will play an important role in protecting watershed

    6 months ago
    News release  photo   resized for connect cvrd

    The CVRD has completed a key land acquisition that will help protect water quality in Comox Lake. The 113-acre parcel of land located at the east end of the lake includes approximately 6,800 feet of Comox Lake waterfront. It is one of the last remaining, large, intact waterfront parcels in the most densely populated area of the watershed. Its purchase by the CVRD ensures the land will be protected for future generations.

    The purchased property can be seen in this aerial photo looking north east from the public beach at Comox Lake.

    The CVRD has completed a key land acquisition that will help protect water quality in Comox Lake. The 113-acre parcel of land located at the east end of the lake includes approximately 6,800 feet of Comox Lake waterfront. It is one of the last remaining, large, intact waterfront parcels in the most densely populated area of the watershed. Its purchase by the CVRD ensures the land will be protected for future generations.

    The purchased property can be seen in this aerial photo looking north east from the public beach at Comox Lake.