Comox Valley Water Treatment Project

Construction is now underway on the Comox Valley Water Treatment Project. Please note, there is no active engagement period underway right now. To follow along on the project’s progress or learn more about the plan, cost and final product, please visit www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/watertreatment or read the FAQs here.



Construction is now underway on the Comox Valley Water Treatment Project. Please note, there is no active engagement period underway right now. To follow along on the project’s progress or learn more about the plan, cost and final product, please visit www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/watertreatment or read the FAQs here.



We invite you to ask your questions here

Q&A

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  • Why are motorized boats allowed on our drinking water reserve, Comox Lake?

    Katy asked 12 months ago

    Hi Katy - the CVRD does not own the land around Comox Lake, nor the lake itself - this means we do not have authority over motorized watercraft use. We must work together with all stakeholders in the watershed to balance interests such as recreation, private ownership, traditional use, active logging, and hydroelectric power generation, while providing drinking water and sustaining critical fish and wildlife habitat. 

    The Comox Lake Watershed Protection Plan was developed to guide the management of the Comox Lake Watershed for the long-term protection of drinking water at the highest possible quality. You can learn more on this site's Connected by Water page over at www.connectcvrd.ca/connectedbywater or by visiting www.comoxvalleyrd.ca/watershed.

  • I’ve been reading about a company, Sharc Energy, that has been converting sewage into energy. Has this company been considered as part of the sewage/wastewater for the valley?

    Will asked over 1 year ago

    Hello Will - Heat recovery from wastewater has successfully been implemented at several BC locations, and is one of the long listed options for resource recovery in the planning process now underway for the Comox Valley sewer service (we have a ConnectCVRD page for that project too - over at connectcvrd.ca/lwmp). At this stage of the process, the team will look at the size of the available resource (in this case heat) and at where it could feasibly be used.Those resource recovery options that look the most promising will be shortlisted for further study, which includes consideration of various technologies and technology providers. The simplest example of a potential use for recovered heat is for the space heating demands at the treatment plant itself, and this is being looked into.
    We hope you'll share your input over at the Help Shape the Future of our Sewer Service page moving forward, if this remains of interest.